September 2017 Travel Restrictions

September 28, 2017

To read the complete proclamation on the latest travel restrictions, please visit the official White House release website. There are also a Fact Sheet and FAQs which provide some additional information. Briefly, the proclamation affects citizens from eight countries as explained below:

  • Chad – the entry into the United States of nationals of Chad, as immigrants, and as nonimmigrants on business (B-1), tourist (B-2), and business/tourist (B-1/B-2) visas, is suspended.
  • Iran – the entry into the United States of nationals of Iran as immigrants and as nonimmigrants is suspended, except that entry by nationals of Iran under valid student (F and M) and exchange visitor (J) visas is not suspended, although such individuals will be subject to enhanced screening and vetting requirements.
  • Libya – the entry into the United States of nationals of Libya, as immigrants, and as nonimmigrants on business (B-1), tourist (B-2), and business/tourist (B-1/B-2) visas, is suspended.
  • North Korea – the entry into the United States of nationals of North Korea as immigrants and nonimmigrants is suspended.
  • Somalia – the entry into the United States of nationals of Somalia as immigrants is suspended, and nonimmigrants traveling to the United States will be subject to enhanced screening and vetting requirements.
  • Syria – the entry into the United States of nationals of Syria as immigrants and nonimmigrants is suspended.
  • Venezuela – the entry into the United States of certain Venezuelan government officials and their immediate family members as nonimmigrants on business (B-1), tourist (B-2), and business/tourist (B-1/B-2) visas is suspended.
  • Yemen – the entry into the United States of nationals of Yemen as immigrants, and as nonimmigrants on business (B-1), tourist (B-2), and business/tourist (B-1/B-2) visas, is suspended.

The FAQs clarify that the restrictions do not apply to lawful permanent residents of the US nor to dual nationals who are traveling on a passport issued by a non-designated country. There are some specific details that are not entirely clear at this point. The University is working with an outside immigration law firm to obtain further clarification and guidance on the impact of the restrictions. In the meantime, please feel free contact OIS with your questions, concerns, and suggestions, so that we can begin to put together appropriate answers and resources.